Wednesday, February 20, 2013

VINTAGE SHOPPING NORTH PARK




URBAN SOLACE
NORTH PARK
      I have a friend, Jean, who lives in San Diego. She is really my “vintage friend” because we go back 64 years. On this fine day, we decide to have lunch at the highly recommended Urban Solace restaurant in North Park. We were not disappointed with the tasty vegetable pot pie, and warm spinach salad that we shared—the cheese biscuits added a nice touch to a perfect lunch. North Park is the new trendy area of San Diego with a lot of one-of-a-kind local shops and restaurants that you don't see at the mall. After lunch we decided to do some exploring.
2871 UNIVERSITY AVENUE, NORTH PARK
      We discovered a vintage shop called Hunt & Gather (I expect a lot of hunting goes into running one of these stores). I haven't found many “good value” vintage clothing shops and in my opinion this place qualifies. The front of the store is well marked with it's name and a display of vintage outfits for both men and women. I loved the old tiles below the large windows and the lovely tiled entrance floor. Signage on the lower window reads: “Reworked * Recycled * Reloved.”
      Hunt & Gather is located at 2871 University Avenue—the owners description of the merchandise is, “local designers, reworked vintage, one-of-a-kind jewelry, records, art & more.” Interesting description and quite appropriate. What I like the most is the fact that it offers a variety of one-of-a- kind vintage clothes as well as some new items—like cool Brazilian capris.
      My impression is that the sizes are a bit larger than some of the authentic old vintage clothes that you see in other shops. Perhaps they are not quite as old, which would account for slightly larger sizes, but they still have the vintage trendy look. Consequently, the prices reflect this—middle of the range and good value.
      Zoe Reynolds, one of the owners, is also a seamstress and designer—she is very friendly and has that “cool young vintage” look. Clearly she has a talent for finding the latest in trendy merchandise for this successful store. Zoe has a sewing machine, conveniently located in the back, for modifying her finds as needed. She and her husband, Lee, have run the business for four years.
      There are some lovely furs in this store—reasonably priced as well. The jewelry is unique and locally made. There are vinyl records for sale. The colorful pop-art on the wall, as well as the intriguing displays of shoes, boots, hats, and sunglasses, add to the ambience.


JEANS' COAT CHOICE FOR COLORADO




      Suggest you run—not walk—to this store if you need a reasonably priced vintage dress or accessories for your next event. I plan to purchase a sleek fitting vintage flowered dress for my next occasion—hope my conservative husband approves.

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

VINTAGE DOORS OF THE GASLAMP QUARTER

WILLIAM HEATH DAVIS HOUSE


    Today, I enjoyed a leisurely morning walk to observe the many architectural wonders in the Gaslamp Quarter. There are 94 historical buildings in the 16 block area in downtown San Diego. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  A walk along 5th and 4th Avenues, between Harbor Drive and Broadway, is a good route to observe the many Victorian-style buildings.
     One of the earliest residences is the William Heath Davis house, built in 1850, which currently houses the Gaslamp Museum--if you need a rest, Pocket Park is right next door.
     In the late 1800's the Gaslamp Quarter was the heart of entertainment for the city--it was known for gambling, saloons, gunmen, prostitutes, and speculators along with hordes of tourists and sailors.

WYATT EARP
LOUIS BANK BUILDING &
GREELEY BUILDING


    
    

HORTON GRAND HOTEL
 
 
     Between 1885 and 1887, Wyatt Earp and his third wife Josie moved to the Gaslamp Quarter (called Stingaree district in the 1880's). They leased four saloons and gambling halls. The most famous was the Oyster Bar located in the Louis Bank Building at 837 5th Avenue. They lived in the Horton Grand Hotel, 311 Island Avenue, most of the seven years they were in San Diego. Earp and his wife left in the 1890's to travel the race horse circuit.
     Today the Gaslamp Quarter is filled with hundreds of shops, restaurants, services, hotels, and nightclubs. It offers a great opportunity to look inside renovated 100-year-old buildings. Considered the entertainment center of San Diego. In the evenings it is crowded and a bit raucous. This "vintage traveler" prefers visiting in the morning with a cup of coffee in hand.

FUNKY GARCIA'S AT SUN CAFE
 
At 421 Market Street, there is the Funky Garcia's at Sun Cafe--originally a shooting gallery that served soup on the side. The soup became so popular that it became a restaurant owned by the Obayashi family. This Japanese family was sent to an internment camp in 1942. Fortunately, a friend operated it until they returned. The Obayashi's sold the cafe in the 1960's.
     Goorin Bros. Hat Shop on 5th Avenue is full of any kind of hat you can think of.
     The Cafe 21 on 5th Avenue is the busiest place in the morning (other than Starbuck's)--it gets good reviews for healthful food.
     There is almost no end to the interesting places you can take a peek at--especially when the San Diego sun is shining, and you have plenty of time to explore.
DUBLIN SQUARE
CHINESE MUSEUM
I.O.O.F. BUILDING

GOORIN BROS. HAT SHOP

SAMUEL I. FOX BUILDING